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Gloucester County New Jersey

Agriculture, industry and suburbia all meet in Gloucester County. The county's 24 municipalities offer something for everyone. Much of Gloucester County is agricultural, with large farms and a variety of livestock that make it one of the chief food-producing sections in the country. Yet, there are many industrial portions of the county that have resulted in consistent job growth in recent years. And still, there are also many neighborhoods and residential communities that are home to Gloucester County's 287,000-plus residents. Gloucester County is spread between the area's 327 square miles. The more densely populated municipalities are in the northeastern areas of the county, closer to Philadelphia, while the more agrarian communities are in the south and western segments.

With a population of approximately 51,000, Washington Township is the largest municipality in Gloucester County. Located in the eastern portion of the county along the border of Camden County and just 25 minutes from Center City Philadelphia, the township's close proximity to Interstate 295 and Routes 42 and 55 make it a prime location. Washington Township is highly developed and densely populated. Yet it has successfully balanced residential and commercial growth, and in recent years has become one of the fastest-growing communities in the state, with the median value of homes in 2008 at $229,900. Several parks, recreational sites and a variety of residential properties add to Washington Township's appeal.

Deptford Township, in northern Gloucester County, is just 10 miles from Philadelphia. Deptford has a strong commercial presence with many shopping centers, a large movie theater and the Deptford Mall — the economic hub of the township. Deptford Township is the third-most populated municipality in Gloucester County, and is often considered a melting pot for the more than 30,000 residents who make their home there. Throughout the township there is a strong emphasis on unity and community. For example, the Deptford Mall has a ‚??Teen Center‚?Ě that espouses an anti-drug message and is a place where kids can hang out with friends, take field trips, receive tutoring for school or participate in counseling.

Woodbury, Gloucester's County seat, borders Deptford Township to the north and is easily accessible from Philadelphia via Route 55. Founded in 1683, Woodbury is the oldest town in the county and was the site of the Revolutionary War Battle of Red Bank. Its 113 acres of parks, along with their six playgrounds, make it a marvelous place to work and play. The median value of homes sold in Woodbury in 2008 was $162,929, and approximately 75 percent of the real estate in Woodbury is residential. The community, however, has recently begun to experience a commercial rebirth, particularly through the revitalization of its Main Street. Using $1 million in grants for facades, streetscapes and neighborhoods, Woodbury is experiencing quite a transformation.

Heritage Glass MuseumIn the center of Gloucester County is the historic town of Glassboro. Just 18 miles southwest of Philadelphia, Glassboro is about a 30-minute drive from Center City Philadelphia using the Walt Whitman Bridge. Houses in this community sold for a median value of $210,000 in 2008. Glassboro is home to the renowned Rowan University and is therefore very much a college-centered town. History buffs may remember that President Lyndon Johnson and Russian Premier Alexei Kosygin met on the campus in June 1967 at a summit that put the school on the international map. In more recent years, Rowan has seen tremendous growth and has been developing land throughout Glassboro. Construction on Rowan Boulevard began in the summer of 2007. Stretching from Rowan's campus to the center of Glassboro, the $150 million project includes 300,000 feet of new retail and office space, a 100-room hotel/conference center, 600 residential units and 775 Rowan student housing units, a performing arts center and much more. Despite all this, Glassboro manages to maintain a definite agricultural presence, and peach farming remains a very popular industry in the area. In fact, Gloucester County is home to the annual New Jersey Peach Festival — a huge, family-oriented farm festival that concludes with the crowning of a New Jersey Peach Queen.

Immediately northeast of Glassboro is Pitman Borough. As a national historic place with 9,331 citizens and a median home value of $200,000 in 2008, the people of Pitman work hard to preserve the unique characteristics and integrity of the town's 19th-century structures. Pitman's main business district lines Broadway Street, and is anchored by the Broadway Theatre, a 1920s-era playhouse that also shows movies for a retro ticket price of $5 per adult. In 2007, Pitman was targeted by Philadelphia Magazine as a town on the verge of a popularity boom. Certainly, its school district, consisting of three elementary schools, one middle school and one high school, adds to its charm. All of the schools are in walking distance for the town's students, so no school buses are needed.

Traveling west into Harrison Township, East Greenwich Township and Woolwich Township, farming becomes increasingly prevalent. Much of the land in these communities is open, offering a more rural lifestyle. Harrison Township covers approximately 20 miles, and contains the village of Mullica Hill, a small historic community that is known for its antique shops and local artisans. Designated a national historic place, Mullica Hill is becoming a popular place for families, with a 2008 median house price of $340,000. Swedesboro, in western Gloucester County, is a quaint community overflowing with charm. Many of the more than 2,000 people in this tight-knit community are long-time residents, and small family businesses passed through the generations are not uncommon. The popular Damask Candies has been a local family business for more than 85 years — make sure you sample their chocolate-covered pretzels!

Business is booming in Gloucester County — since 2003, the county has been consistently ranked among the top counties for job growth nationwide. Add that to the list of reasons why this may just be the place for you. From historic farms to modern shopping centers, luscious peaches to sweet candy — it's all right there in Gloucester County.

RESOURCES

POPULATION
287,860

GLOUCESTER COUNTY WEB SITE
www.co.gloucester.nj.us

COUNTY GOVERNMENT
609-853-3390

COUNTY SEAT
Old Courthouse
1 N. Broad St.
Woodbury, NJ 08096

LOCAL DAILY NEWSPAPER

Gloucester County Times
309 S. Broad St.
Woodbury, NJ 08096
856-845-3300
www.nj.com/gloucester

GLOUCESTER COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

1492 Tanyard Road
Sewell, NJ 08080
856-468-6500
www.state.nj.us/education

MAIN LIBRARY

Mullica Hill Branch
389 Wolfert Station Road
Mullica Hill, NJ 08062
856-223-6000
www.gloucester.lib.nj.us
There are six branch and one independent association libraries in the library system.

REALTOR

Gloucester Salem Counties Board of Realtors
1167 Mantua Pike, Rt. 45
Mantua, NJ 08051
856-468-8224
www.gscbor.com

HOSPITALS & HOUSING INFO

For a listing of Hospital Systems located in Gloucester County, see the Medical Services Section - Greater Philadelphia Hospital Systems.

Click here for County Housing Information and Related Figures.

 
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